May 2015

Colleagues, Supervisors Pay Tribute to Outstanding Clinical Engineers, BMETs

Since 2010, AAMI and its Technology Management Council have celebrated healthcare technology management (HTM) professionals by designating the third week in May as a time to raise awareness of the important job they do and to highlight their achievements.

John Klein
John Klein
Richard Matthews
Richard Matthews
Laura Groselle
Laura Groselle
Russelle Akins
Russell Akins
Don Hildebrand
Don Hildebrand
Jose Lara
Jose Lara
  Scptt Rodriguez
Scott Rodriguez

Running May 17–23, HTM Week 2015 will spotlight the contributions of biomedical equipment technicians (BMETs), clinical engineers, and others in this field, which has gained recognition and respect throughout the healthcare community. In preparation for the week, AAMI asked members of the field to highlight exemplary HTM professionals who have gone above and beyond to help patients.

Richard Heck, a biomedical engineer at UnityPoint Health System in Des Moines, IA, recognized John Klein, a senior biomedical equipment technician. Klein “is a case study of dedication and determination,” Heck said. He will travel to a remote location to service a medical device, saving patients and families from driving to another hospital. “An unknown number of patients have benefited from his commitment, regardless of time, weather, or location,” added Heck.

Anthony J. Snyder, a biomedical maintenance technician at San Antonio Medical Center, paid tribute to Richard Matthews for his dedication to mentoring staff, helping them become certified BMETs. Matthews is one of four technicians overseeing the maintenance of the 32 operating rooms within Brooke Army Medical Center at Fort Sam Houston, TX. An important factor of his success is the closeness he shares with his coworkers. “He told me one day that without his team, he is nothing,” said Snyder. “However, he is more than just a BMET.  Matthews is the epitome of a BMET.”

The Cleveland Clinic’s Laura Groselle has been a clinical engineer for more than 30 years, and Mark Heston, operations director at the organization, called her work ethic “tenacious.” She oversees the main hospital campus that includes 44 buildings. Groselle makes each request for help a priority. “Regardless of how long her day is or how late the request comes in, Laura treats each and every call with urgency, dignity, and respect,” Heston said.

Carol Wyatt, manager of biomedical technology services at Baylor Scott & White Health Care in McKinney, TX, wanted to honor three HTM superstars, two of whom ensured the proper working order of donated equipment going to Guatemala and Ghana—including incubators and infant warmers. Senior BMETs Russell Akins and Don Hildebrand donated their time to perform this task, which was part of an effort to recycle medical equipment for overseas hospitals and medical missions.

Jose Lara, a BMET at the health system’s Irving, TX, campus, responded to an after-hours emergency call for a therapeutic cooling unit at a different facility, to help avert what could have turned into an adverse patient event. “Jose repaired the power entry module quickly and stayed to ensure the unit was functional before leaving,” said Wyatt. He was recognized with an award for his quick response and caring attitude, as well as for potentially averting a patient crisis, said Wyatt.

U.S. Navy Veteran Scott Rodriguez discovered a talent for problem solving as an electronics technician aboard submarines. After working for a biomedical repair services company in Texas, he applied to the General Richard B. Myers Veterans Biomedical Equipment Technology Program at MediSend in Dallas. Scott graduated at the top of his class and was immediately offered a job with the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium in Sitka. He and his wife jumped at the opportunity. Although Alaska has a shortage of biomeds and it takes longer to get supplies, he enjoys the challenge and is proud to be filling an important need.

“Veterans make wonderful employees. They work well in a team environment, bring a sense of leadership, and take pride in their work,” said MediSend CEO Nick Hallack. “Scott would be an asset to any community.”